how kevin love came to live on my desk (or the perks of a small company)

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One day, at least two years ago, I was sitting in my CEO’s office chatting away, sharing concerns, developing some strategy, getting re-motivated – all those normal things you do when you talk to your CEO behind closed doors. (Just kidding. I don’t know what’s normal with your CEO, but I would imagine not the interactions I have with mine.) As I was leaving, I noticed she had an autographed basketball, so I picked it up and looked at it. Kevin Love had scribbled on it. I think the only thing I said was, “Wow, that’s cool!” and she told me to take it. I argued I didn’t want to take it, she argued back and since her name is on the building, I gave up. So, I took it and it’s been sitting on my desk ever since. And that was the last conversation she and I ever had about Kevin Love.

Flash forward to this morning, when I noticed, after being at my desk for 30 minutes, that there’s an 11×14 autographed picture of Kevin Love sitting on top of my pen holder. I asked my first co-worker that came in this morning. She said she didn’t know anything about it, but then instant messaged me to say my new supervisor had given it to me. I asked him about it. He said my CEO had it in her office and told him that I really liked Kevin Love.

Little things like that make working for a small company – this small company – the greatest thing ever. Managers, supervisors, leads, whatever, take note: If you want your employee to truthfully feel awesome about working for you, convince them that you care about them as an individual. Yes, awesome insurance or five thousand weeks of vacation are great, but I forget about all of that when I see that the owner of my company has remembered something so trivial after years have gone by.

One thought on “how kevin love came to live on my desk (or the perks of a small company)

  1. That is so frickin’ cool. Not even so much the Kevin Love part of it but, as you said, that your co-workers at all levels pay attention and care.

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